Bug spray abuse on the rise; incidents of overdose being reported in West Virginia

Bug spray abuse on the rise; incidents of overdose being reported in West Virginia

A new kind of menace has gripped Boone County, West Virginia. According to local news channel WCHS, quite a few people in the country have overdosed on a wasp repellent, used as a substitute for methamphetamine. Local police authorities have reported an increase in the use of the spray in order to attain a meth-like high, but for a much cheaper price.

Identified as one of the recent drug trends in the country, authorities have named it “wasping.” According to a 2018 report, wasping is a practice that involves the abuse of ingredients used in insect killers to get a kick. The substance could be injected or inhaled by crystallizing the spray on hot metal sheets. Continue reading

Prisons to Drug Courts: Opting for better life

Prisons to Drug Courts: Opting for better life

Despite umpteen measures, the United States of America’s struggle to control drug overdose deaths continues. Not just deaths, drugs are a major reason behind the rising number of prisoners. During 1993 to 2011, there were 3 million admissions into federal and state prisons for drug offenses. Over the same period, there were 30 million arrests for drug crimes, 24 million of which were for possession.

What is a matter of greater concern is that 80 percent of the offenders in prison abused drugs or alcohol, nearly 50 percent inmates were clinically addicted and almost 60 percent tested positive for drugs at the time of arrest. These statistics are relevant because approximately 60 to 80 percent drug abusers commit a new crime as soon as they are released from prison and the post-incarceration crime is normally drug-driven. Continue reading